Furthering a just, fair and equitable Pinellas County where all can participate, prosper, and reach their full potential

Policy
CHANGE

Eliminate public policies that create barriers and develop policies that can improve equity.

Institutional Practice
CHANGE

Eliminate regulations and day-to-day decision making in public and private institutions that generate biased outcomes.

Narrative
CHANGE

Modify the language, images and cognitive cues that form the conventional understanding of poverty and race from one of blame to a deeper understanding of the barriers that created the inequities.

REPORTS

An Equity Profile of Pinellas County

$3.6 billion

The estimated increase in economic output if there were no racial gaps in income.

Aside from the deep desire we hold as citizens for justice and fairness, equity has been identified as the superior economic model. Experts estimate that the Pinellas County economy would be $3.6 billion larger if there were no racial gaps in income.

Furthermore, if additional income is generated by families who have low incomes the following areas will be positively impacted: health, academic success of children, quality of housing, likelihood of living in a more safe and secure environment, civic engagement.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What is the UNITE Pinellas Collective?

What is the UNITE Pinellas Collective?

  • A collective of organizations united in a common mission to increase income and race equity through county-wide systems change.

  • UNITE Pinellas will focus on policy solutions as a part of a continuum of many people and organizations who have a long history of working for fairness and justice.

Who are the organizational members of the UNITE Pinellas Collective?

Who are the organizational members of the UNITE Pinellas Collective?

Please take a look below at the logos for the many organizations that are members of the UNITE Pinellas Collective.

What is the history of the organization?

What is the history of the organization?

  • The aftermath of the disparity data from the Failure Factory articles moved a group of organizations to consider the question of equity.

  • Careful listening and analysis led to 3-prong approach aimed at changes to:
    • Policy – laws that allocate resources and influence access to opportunity
    • Social and Institutional Practices – operating procedures that generate biased outcomes
    • Traditional narratives of blame – language, images, frames and cognitive cues that form the public’s conventional wisdom about race and poverty

What is the mission?

What is the mission?

Systemic change that generates income and racial fairness and equity.

What are the 5 main takeaways about equity in Pinellas County?

What are the 5 main takeaways about equity in Pinellas County?

  • Inequity is historically rooted in public policy and bias and is not based on personal failings.

  • Equity is the superior economic model - the cost of inequity is borne by the entire community.

  • There is a path forward. By learning more about local dynamics and conditions and exposing the root causes that underlie disparities, our community can influence changes that can create a more just, fair and equitable Pinellas County.

  • The levers that are most likely to generate change are policy, institutional practices and changing the traditional narrative.

  • A lack of community awareness of inequity exists nationally and in Pinellas County.

How will progress happen?

How will progress happen?

  • Over the next 12 to 24 months, the Equity Profile will be used to help pinpoint some areas that deserve more detailed examination related to the policies, institutional practices, and narratives. People most impacted by those issues, in concert with policy and practice specialists, will develop solutions and influence their adoption.

  • The Nonprofit, Philanthropic and Governmental sectors will be encouraged to increase the level of diversity and inclusion within their organizations codified by specific policies.

How will success be measured?

How will success be measured?

The transformation of policy, practice, and cultural change driven by equity is a long-term effort. Over time, the very measures that are a part of the Equity Profile will change and evolve to better reflect our progress.

How is this initiative currently funded?

How is this initiative currently funded?

  • Foundation for a Healthy St. Petersburg

  • Juvenile Welfare Board

  • United Way Suncoast

  • In-kind support

How can others get involved?

How can others get involved?

Since the Equity Profile will be used to help pinpoint some areas that deserve more detailed examination, people most impacted by those issues, in concert with policy and practice specialists, will be engaged to develop solutions and influence their adoption.

Where can one learn more?

Where can one learn more?

One can learn more about equity in Pinellas County on this website as it expands over the coming months and in a forthcoming Equity Resource Guide.

What would the community look like if these changes did not happen?

What would the community look like if these changes did not happen?

If the community is unable to generate lasting systemic changes total community potential will be unrealized. Inequities will continue to cost everyone. Fairness and justice will be unrealized.

What are some specific policies that got us all here?

What are some specific policies that got us all here?

The current patterns of racial inequity are a legacy of the nation's past when federal and local laws made the participation and prosperity of people of color nearly impossible. Federally sanctioned housing discrimination maintained neighborhood whiteness by restricting where people of color could live. Laws like the Social Security Act of 1935 helped millions of workers enter the middle class, but excluded many people of color, and thus the ability to accumulate wealth. These government practices were bolstered by local laws and customs that extended segregation to schools, parks, hospitals, restaurants, and other public and private spaces. The residual effects are still in force.

  • Redlining

  • GI Bill

  • Social Security Act 1935 and the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938

  • Jim Crow state & local laws

What would our community look like if equitable policy changes were implemented?

What would our community look like if equitable policy changes were implemented?

Aside from the deep desire we each hold as citizens for justice and fairness, there are concrete impacts that can be measured and seen. PolicyLink, the national leader around equity efforts, has identified equity as the “superior economic model.” PolicyLink estimates that the Pinellas County economy would be $3.6 billion larger if there were no racial gaps in income. Furthermore, there is research that shows that if additional income is generated by families who have low incomes there are five areas of well being that are positively impacted: health, academic success of children, quality of housing, likelihood of living in a more safe and secure environment, civic engagement.

UNITE Pinellas Collective Funders

Foundation for a Healthy St. Petersburg
Juvenile Welfare Board
United Way Suncoast

UNITE Pinellas Collective Members

2020 Plan St. Pete
AARP
Allegany Franciscan Ministries
Central-Florida-Behavorial-Health-Network.png
City of St. Petersburg
Community Foundation of Tampa Bay
Florida Department of Health
Forward Pinellas
Foundation for a Healthy St. Petersburg
Juvenile Welfare Board
One Community Plan
Pinellas Community Foundation
Pinellas County
Pinellas County Schools
Pinellas County Urban League
Pinellas Education Foundation
St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce
St. Petersburg College
Tampa Bay Healthcare Collaborative
United Way Suncoast

Sign up for the UNITE Pinellas Newsletter
Email Updates

Questions or Comments?
Send a message